WHAT IF I WAS IN AN ACCIDENT AND THE OTHER DRIVER HAD NO INSURANCE?

When the other driver either has no insurance or hit you and then left the scene, you may still be able to make a claim against your own insurance company. If your own insurance policy is up to date, then you will have coverage for these types of accidents. Making a claim against your insurance company for uninsured/under-insured motorist coverage can be a complicated process. Contact an attorney today at Robbins Law, LLC to discuss your case.

HOW LONG DO I HAVE TO FILE A LAWSUIT?

In most situations you have two years from the date of the injury to file a suit. However, this rule does not apply in every case and only an experienced attorney can help you determine if you can still make your claim. Worker's compensation claims are limited even further, to one year from the date of injury. Again, an experienced attorney can help analyze your worker's compensation claim and determine if a longer time period may be applicable.

WHAT SHOULD I DO IMMEDIATELY AFTER AN ACCIDENT?

The first thing to do is check on your own health status and the status of anyone else in the vehicle with you. If you are able, call the police and remain at the scene until they arrive. The police will assist in getting an ambulance if you need one. Do not say anything to the other driver about the cause of the accident. Go to the Emergency Department of a local hospital. Remember, your health is of the utmost importance. You should also report the accident to your insurance company if you are able.
After you are stable, call Robbins Law to speak to an attorney.

Only an experienced attorney can help you assess whether or not you have a claim.

HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAVE A PERSONAL INJURY CLAIM?

If your body was injured or your property was injured, then you have suffered a personal injury However, not all injuries are someone else's fault. It is not always necessary to have a physical injury to bring a personal injury lawsuit. In the case of an assault, for example, you do not need to show that a person's action caused you actual physical harm, but only that you expected some harm to come to you. Some of the most common types of personal injury cases involve car accidents, or individuals who have fallen. Less common personal injury cases involve lead paint, negligent security, and medical malpractice.